In our business, speed is everything. Fortunately, we're the track stars of rail supply

With the first delivery items across North America (the fastest across Canada), we can get you what you need, when you need it.

One Stop Shopping. it doesn't get any easier. Really, it doesn't.

From ballast, ties, turnouts, and switches, to custom parts, assembly and turnkey construction services, we have the end-to-end solutions you need!

We Go Everywhere you do - even if it's the middle of nowhere.

If you need a rail products, we can get it there, with fast, reliable delivery across North America.

We've got everything you need, including options.

Choose the rail solutions that work for your budget from our large on-hand inventory of new, relay and reconditioned stock.

ABOUT US

We sell rail material. From point of order to timely delivery;

experience, first hand, NARP’s steadfast service and seamless process.

Established in 2010, North American Rail Products (NARP) sells rail material. New, relayed or reconditioned, we can supply everything from the ballast up. With service centres in Delta, British Columbia, Argyle, Manitoba we are capable of shipping to wherever you are; across Canada and the US. From point of order to timely delivery, experience, first hand, NARP ’s steadfast service and seamless process. We’re known for our reactionary reliability. Get what you need when you need it.

We sell rail material. From point of order to timely delivery;

Our Blog

Blog

The Importance of Track Maintenance

In the rail industry maintenance is a key component to ensure a safe and efficient track for both freight and passenger trains. Rail is susceptible to wear and tear because of the heavy weights and high speeds the cars may reach. Without proper maintenance you may...

Blog

New vs Relay

NARP supplies a variety of new and relay rail across North America. You may be wondering, what's the difference? The difference between new and relay rail is that new rail hasn't been placed on a track before. Any time you take a piece of new rail out of the track...

Rail Products

3 words: We Have Inventory. At NARP, we have, in stock, what you’ll need in rail materials and products; new, relayed or reconditioned. When it comes to rail products, we can supply everything…

Services

We offer creative cost-effective railroad solutions and a range of rail services to better assist you in building and maintaining your rail system. We leave no stone unturned in our quest to get you…

News & Events

News

We have Rails, Turnouts & OTM!

We have Rails, Turnouts, OTM and pretty much everything else you will need for your rail project. Our inventory is vast and readily available. If you require a special product for your application, give us a call, we can help! Check out our products to...

News

Relay Rail – you need it, we have it!

Relay rail. You need it. We have it. In fact, we have an abundance of it. We have a relay rail of all sorts available to ship. If you need it, we probably have it. Call one of our Sales Managers in your region for more...

News

Rail materials to meet your budget

With railway solutions available throughout North America, we know we have the inventory you’ll need to repair or replace your existing rail materials. Not only are we sure that we have rail materials you need, but we know we can provide our rail materials to you...

We Are Social

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We are proud members of CARS. CARS represents over 155 companies who are important to the operations of the railways and transit authorities.

We are proud members of CARS. CARS represents over 155 companies who are important to the operations of the railways and transit authorities. ... See MoreSee Less

Happy mothers day to all the mothers on the NARP team & all mothers around the world! We appreciate you!

Happy mothers day to all the mothers on the NARP team & all mothers around the world! We appreciate you! ... See MoreSee Less

NARP supplies a variety of new and relay rail across North America. You may be wondering, whats the difference?

The difference between new and relay rail is that new rail hasnt been placed on a track before. Any time you take a piece of new rail out of the track to put it elsewhere, that piece of rail is now considered relay. On high volume main line routes, the specifications of the rail must be kept within certain parameters. Rail inspections done on these high-volume routes look for any flaws in the steel or wear and tear, if they are out of the parameters due to wear and tear then that piece must be replaced with a new one.

Now, the life of that piece of rail that is being replaced doesnt end there. Just because the rail has been worn beyond the allowable parameters of the high-volume main line doesnt mean it is inadmissible in other classes of service. 

A good flow progression for the life of a piece of rail would follow as so;

(New Rail) Heavy Duty Main Line -> (Relay) Secondary Route Main Line -> (Relay) Sidings/Yard Track -> Scrap.

There are 4 classifications of relay rail; I, II, III, and IV. For the rail to qualify for a certain class, the rail must be inspected to see how much wear (from new) it has. For example, a 115lb piece of Class I rail can have a maximum of 1/8” wear on the top and 3/8” wear on the gage, whereas a 115lb piece of Class IV rail can have a maximum of ½” wear on the top and 7/8” wear on the gage. Depending on what kind of circumstance you find yourself in will dictate what kind of rail you should be using in that section. If you are using slow, heavy traffic in a scrap yard for example then class II or class III might be your best option, whereas if you’re replacing a Secondary Route Main Line, you will want to be looking for Class I options. Keep in mind, curves on all routes will need to be replaced more than long straight sections as the weight of the cars pushes more on one rail than the other while making the turn. 

So, if youre looking to purchase New or Relay rail take a look at the project ahead of you and think of the following questions to narrow down your search; 

- How much weight is going to be on the tracks?
- What kind of rail needs to be replaced?
- Do the train cars have to make many turns?
- How fast are the train cars going on the track?
- Is it a Heavy Duty, or Seconday Main Line?
- Is it just for a siding/yard?

Whether youre building a brand new Heavy Duty Main Line or just replacing pieces in your siding or yard NARP can give you a helping hand.

NARP supplies a variety of new and relay rail across North America. You may be wondering, what's the difference?

The difference between new and relay rail is that new rail hasn't been placed on a track before. Any time you take a piece of new rail out of the track to put it elsewhere, that piece of rail is now considered relay. On high volume main line routes, the specifications of the rail must be kept within certain parameters. Rail inspections done on these high-volume routes look for any flaws in the steel or wear and tear, if they are out of the parameters due to wear and tear then that piece must be replaced with a new one.

Now, the life of that piece of rail that is being replaced doesn't end there. Just because the rail has been worn beyond the allowable parameters of the high-volume main line doesn't mean it is inadmissible in other classes of service.

A good flow progression for the life of a piece of rail would follow as so;

(New Rail) Heavy Duty Main Line -> (Relay) Secondary Route Main Line -> (Relay) Sidings/Yard Track -> Scrap.

There are 4 classifications of relay rail; I, II, III, and IV. For the rail to qualify for a certain class, the rail must be inspected to see how much wear (from new) it has. For example, a 115lb piece of Class I rail can have a maximum of 1/8” wear on the top and 3/8” wear on the gage, whereas a 115lb piece of Class IV rail can have a maximum of ½” wear on the top and 7/8” wear on the gage. Depending on what kind of circumstance you find yourself in will dictate what kind of rail you should be using in that section. If you are using slow, heavy traffic in a scrap yard for example then class II or class III might be your best option, whereas if you’re replacing a Secondary Route Main Line, you will want to be looking for Class I options. Keep in mind, curves on all routes will need to be replaced more than long straight sections as the weight of the cars pushes more on one rail than the other while making the turn.

So, if you're looking to purchase New or Relay rail take a look at the project ahead of you and think of the following questions to narrow down your search;

- How much weight is going to be on the tracks?
- What kind of rail needs to be replaced?
- Do the train cars have to make many turns?
- How fast are the train cars going on the track?
- Is it a Heavy Duty, or Seconday Main Line?
- Is it just for a siding/yard?

Whether you're building a brand new Heavy Duty Main Line or just replacing pieces in your siding or yard NARP can give you a helping hand.
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